Tag Archives: photojournalism

The April 2017 Show And Tell

It is virtually impossible to not be greatly affected by your surroundings and culture in your worldview. It’s also virtually impossible to understand other cultures without a frame of reference. It’s hard to obtain a frame of reference without actually going, but the next best thing is pictures and video. So consider this blog to be my best attempt to provide a frame of reference. I’ve been back from Ethiopia for about three weeks now. Frequently after a trip, I pause my pontificating for a bit and just post pictures. There are unfortunately a lot of pictures I can’t show. However, here are a number of pictures from places we went and the people we met on the street. More later. Enjoy.

Our frequent server of coffee and good food.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A camel train going down the road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerial shot of farms and villages East of Addis Ababa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woman in the butcher shop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A man in thought on the street.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A night scene in Dire Dawa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An immense tree in the ancient city of Harar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable sellers in Harar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kids outside the hotel in Dire Dawa. Most, I believe, were professional beggars sent out by their parents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The mountains of eastern Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even the goats chew Qat here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The desert between Harar and Dire Dawa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four Continents In 24 Hours

I am now back from Ethiopia. My plan was to write at least a post or two from in the field. Unfortunately, a few days before I left, electronic devices in carry-on bags were restricted on flights from a number of middle-east airports including one I would be traveling through. This meant that I was going to have to check my iPad in my luggage. Due to experiences some of my fellow travelers have had with airport workers with sticky fingers, I opted not to bring any more expensive gear than was absolutely necessary.

Though I would have liked to have been able to write from the field, by best thoughts on the things I’ve seen and experienced when I travel often come not during, but weeks or even months afterward. I need time to process and ruminate on things. I took a couple thousand pictures and hours of video on this trip, and looking at those will also help me to put things together.

If my writing seems a bit off, it’s because I’m still jet lagged. I was up for almost 48 hours straight this time coming home, due to the schedule and some very uncomfortable flights. (I truly hate middle seats). I traveled a different airline this time than I have before, Turkish Air to be specific. I had some initial trepidation about flying this airline, but after the experience I can honestly say I would do it again. The food, by airline food standards, was actually pretty good. Furthermore, I had an eight hour layover in Istanbul on the way home. Turkish Air, though they don’t seem to advertise it, will give you a free tour of the city with a guide on a nice bus if you have a long layover. We opted to do this, and I’ve got to say that Istanbul is a fantastic city to visit. At least the parts that I visited were modern and clean, but full of ancient historic sights everywhere.

So the long and the short of it is this. I had lunch in Eastern Ethiopia, dinner in Addis Ababa, Turkish coffee in Istanbul, then I flew to New York where I had pizza in Brooklyn with a very old friend. In Istanbul I was able to see Asia across the water as I drank my coffee. All told it took about thirty six hours, but from leaving Africa to landing in New York was about 24 hours. It was not the most relaxing way to travel, but it was an adventure, and I was able to add Turkey to the list of countries I’ve been to.

Soon I will start writing about Ethiopia, but I need to get some rest first so I can put two words together and have them make sense.

The Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Morning in Istanbul

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pizza in New York

A Year In Photographs.

Each year, I try to publish some of my favorite photos of the year. This year, as I went through my files for the various things I took pictures of this year, it became apparent to my the vast diversity of things I shot this year. Up until this point, I hadn’t realized this year was different from any other. Sure, I take pictures in Africa every year, but this year there was so much more than that. From Eastern Ethiopia to shooting a wedding in the Bahamas to documenting life on a fishing boat, I truly have a lot that I’m happy to have captured this year. I’m posting quite a few photos in this blog, and there are many more I could have posted. Some made it in for the technical quality of the photo, some for the backstory or the story the picture tells. Hopefully the latter two will represent well. Please enjoy. I look forward to the adventures that 2016 brings. All photos can be clicked on for a larger view.

Men working on a shrimping boat off the coast of South Carolina.
Men working on a shrimping boat off the coast of South Carolina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wide panorama of the Kibera slum, largest urban slum in Africa
wide panorama of the Kibera slum, largest urban slum in Africa

 

 

 

 

 

 

A patchwork of farms surround a small village in Ethiopia.
A patchwork of farms surround a small village in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time goes by around a bride and groom in downtown Charleston, South Carolina.
Time goes by around a bride and groom in downtown Charleston, South Carolina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental portrait of Sarah Sanford-Rausch.
Environmental portrait of Sarah Sanford-Rausch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People watch as a whale shark and manta ray swim past at the Georgia Aquarium.
People watch as a whale shark and manta ray swim past at the Georgia Aquarium.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my favorite wedding shots of the year.
One of my favorite wedding shots of the year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can you not love this elderly man from Ethiopia?
How can you not love this elderly man from Ethiopia?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The gratitude of a woman saved from starvation.
The gratitude of a woman saved from starvation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A portrait I did this fall on Daufuskie Island, South Carolina.
A portrait I did this fall on Daufuskie Island, South Carolina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This picture for me sums up what Harar, Ethiopia looks and feels like.
This picture for me sums up what Harar, Ethiopia looks and feels like.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A shot at sunset as the storm rolled in near my home.
A shot at sunset as the storm rolled in near my home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My favorite of the wedding I shot in Hopetown, The Bahamas this year.
My favorite of the wedding I shot in Hopetown, The Bahamas this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The captain of the fishing vessel I was shooting on this fall.
The captain of the fishing vessel I was shooting on this fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time lapse of the waves rolling in past the bride and groom.
Time lapse of the waves rolling in past the bride and groom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candid portrait of a girl in Kibera, Kenya.
Candid portrait of a girl in Kibera, Kenya.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Action portrait of dancers for a Beaufort Lifestyles Magazine.
Action portrait of dancers for a Beaufort Lifestyles Magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

time exposure of young man standing in flowing water looking at dead flooded trees
time exposure of young man standing in flowing water looking at dead flooded trees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woman walking with a donkey in the highlands of Ethiopia.
Woman walking with a donkey in the highlands of Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author Pat Conroy in this environmental portrait in his home.
Author Pat Conroy in this environmental portrait in his home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my favorite Ethiopia shots ever, taken in Dire Dawa.
One of my favorite Ethiopia shots ever, taken in Dire Dawa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portrait taken for Beaufort Lifestyles Magazine.
Portrait taken for Beaufort Lifestyles Magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pastors totally lost in prayer in Ethiopia.
Pastors totally lost in prayer in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time exposure of waves and driftwood in the ocean at sunset
Time exposure of waves and driftwood in the ocean at sunset

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wedding portrait I shot on Fripp Island.
A wedding portrait I shot on Fripp Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethiopian athletes playing football (soccer) at dawn.
Ethiopian athletes playing football (soccer) at dawn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short time exposure of traffic in downtown Nairobi, Kenya.
Short time exposure of traffic in downtown Nairobi, Kenya.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I photo I did for a couple's engagement this fall.
I photo I did for a couple’s engagement this fall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kids hamming it up for the camera in Kibera, Kenya.
Kids hamming it up for the camera in Kibera, Kenya.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoying a "Stoney" with my wife in Kibera.
Enjoying a “Stoney” with my wife in Kibera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of my couples in an avenue of oaks.
One of my couples in an avenue of oaks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athletes receiving new shoes donated from Nike in Ethiopia.
Athletes receiving new shoes donated from Nike in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A couple watching the storm roll past just after their wedding.
A couple watching the storm roll past just after their wedding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back From Kibera

Less than forty eight hours ago, we got back from Kibera. All in all, I’d say the trip was a success. We were able to build good relationships with the people in the church and help out in the daycare. We were also able to help in some financial ways, but I see these as secondary to the job we came to do, which was build understanding of the issues and the people so we can partner for the long term. None of that can be done if we go with blinders on and a singular goal to build something or feed somebody. We are broken in certain ways, some of us financially, some of us spiritually, some of us in other ways. The goal of missions is to help each other overcome these various forms of brokenness. As I think over the issues I saw and more is revealed to me over time, I will write about these more in depth.

The trip home was an ordeal. My wife got sick to her stomach half way through the first flight, and is still a bit uneasy two days later. It was to the point where she came that close (you can’t see me thumb and forefingers about half an inch apart) to not getting on the plane from Zurich back to the United States. A couple missionaries saw what was going on and came to pray for Lynn. She met someone in the last five minutes before boarding who had some prescription nausea medication, and she was able to settle her stomach enough to board. God truly puts the right people in the right place.  My friends wife also got sick to her stomach on the plane, but not to that extent. Then we had to get through the nightmare that is customs in Dulles (very close to dullard), where everything is done in the least efficient manner possible. Our plane was boarding by the time we got through that, but we still needed to get to a different section of the airport entirely. As I rounded the corner I saw the sign that said the next train would be coming in 23 seconds. I shouted back the information to everybody else, and we managed to get onto that train. After getting off, I ran ahead to the gate and found they were about to close it. I told them my group was right behind me, and they let us on. I can feel my blood pressure rising even as I write about it. Nonetheless, we made it on our last plane and back home.

I have been going through the pictures from the trip. I have far fewer this time. As I mentioned in a previous blog, my role was very different for this trip, and I was watching out for three other people rather than focusing all my attention on taking pictures. Nevertheless I have some that give what I feel is a good representation of our trip, and I will post more later as I have something to write about. Enjoy.

child in Obedis' daycare in Kibera.
child in Obedis’ daycare in Kibera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children on the outskirts of Kibera. They were there as I shot video interviews.
Children on the outskirts of Kibera. They were there as I shot video interviews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taking dinner together
Taking dinner together

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carl having a good time with the kids.
Carl having a good time with the kids.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lynn in her element, teaching the kids, and trying to learn some Swahili.
Lynn in her element, teaching the kids, and trying to learn some Swahili.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kibera right after a heavy rainstorm.
Kibera right after a heavy rainstorm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A child looking in the window of the daycare.
One of Obeid’s daughters looking in the window of the daycare.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obedi making ugali.
Obedi making ugali.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nairobi shortly after dark.
Nairobi shortly after dark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beauty in the little things.
Beauty in the little things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bunny and Obedi walking through Kibera.
Bunny and Obedi walking through Kibera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The market on the railroad tracks.
The market on the railroad tracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An overview of Kibera.
An overview of Kibera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Masha and Gaz, great guys.
Masha and Gaz, great guys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the daycare kids.
One of the daycare kids.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tent Making

In the book of acts, Paul is described as a tentmaker. “Then Paul left Athens and went to Corinth. There he became acquainted with a Jew named Aquila, born in Pontus, who had recently arrived from Italy with his wife, Priscilla. They had left Italy when Claudius Caesar deported all Jews from Rome. Paul lived and worked with them, for they were tentmakers just as he was.”   Paul didn’t simply live and travel through the generosity of others, he worked as he went. He had a trade.

I have to be honest. Fundraising is my least favorite part of missions and traveling for the church. It takes a huge amount of time and effort, and I don’t really like asking people for money. Fortunately, I have a trade that helps. Whereas Paul made tents, I take pictures. The blessing for me is that I can take pictures anywhere I go, and when I come home, they become art that helps fund my next trip. It’s at least partially self-sustaining. Today I sold two art pieces, the proceeds from which will probably fund about ten percent of our upcoming trip to Kenya. It truly is a blessing to be able to do this.  So with that thought, I just wanted to post the two pictures that sold, and put up a few others that I’m thinking of replacing them with on the Thibault Gallery wall in Beaufort, South Carolina. I’d actually like feedback on what people would like to see as art, so opinions are welcome. What I like is frequently not what other people like, and vice versa.

A widow in Ethiopia surveys the small field where she grows wheat for her family.
A widow in Ethiopia surveys the small field where she grows wheat for her family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baskets of fresh tea leaves sit under a tree in Kimunye, Kenya
Baskets of fresh tea leaves sit under a tree in Kimunye, Kenya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A waterfall flows through the lush rainforest on the slopes of Mt Kenya. This is a possible art piece.
A waterfall flows through the lush rainforest on the slopes of Mt Kenya. This is a possible art piece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Athletes train in the early morning dust of the Ethiopian highlands. Possible art piece.
Athletes train in the early morning dust of the Ethiopian highlands. Possible art piece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A man drives his horse and wagon over the cobblestones in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. Possible art piece.
A man drives his horse and wagon over the cobblestones in Dire Dawa, Ethiopia. Possible art piece.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wide panorama of mount Kenya at dawn. Possible art piece.
wide panorama of mount Kenya at dawn. Possible art piece.

 

Revisiting The Woman Who Had Never Seen Her Face.

The woman who had not seen her face.
The woman who had not seen her face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in November of 2014, on my first trip to Ethiopia, I met a woman who had either never seen her face or had not seen it in a very long time. I had gone out walking through the countryside one evening and came across a woman with incredible character in her face. She was standing in front of a simple hut that was no more than ten feet by ten feet, made out of sticks with mud packed between them to keep the breeze out on the cold nights up in the mountains. She smiled at me as walked past, and I simply had to get a picture of her. As a courtesy, I showed the image to her on the back of the camera. When I did, the reaction was not what I had expected. Usually it’s either joy or embarrassment, but in this case, she just looked at the image and began to touch the parts of her face. Evidently what was on the screen was not how she pictured herself. I also found this to be the case with some other people I have taken pictures of since then. I took pictures of a pastor on my most recent trip in April of this year, and after seeing it, he indicated that he had not known that his hair was gray. I think there are just not very many mirrors around, and not a lot of standing water for people to see their reflections.

When I come back to an area in Africa that I’ve been to before, I try to bring pictures back of the people I’ve either stayed with or who I plan to visit again. I simply had to give this woman a picture of herself. On the last evening I was in the village, I went out walking again, hoping to find her. Just as before, she was sitting outside her simple home, looking out over the beautiful view of the farm-covered mountains of Ethiopia, making a grass basket. I greeted her, and even though I had a heavy beard this time, she recognized me. I have her the picture, and here are the results.

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Here’s a reference to my previous blog post about my first experience with the woman who had not seen her face. https://southsudantraveler.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/not-seeing-yourself-for-a-very-long-time/

 

Show And Tell

So I’m back in the land of the Internet now, Addis Ababa to be specific. I had intended to post something thoughtful about something that happened in this trip, but unfortunately it didn’t save, for some reason or another. Consequently I’ve shown up unprepared. The alternative then is a sort of show and tell about a few of my favorite unedited photos from this trip to Ethiopia. I’m sure I will do some cropping and editing later, but I have some shots that I’m very happy with even as they are.

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How To Pack For A Photo Trip To Africa

Every once in a while I like to give some practical advice to people who might be taking a trip to Africa, particularly those who are going primarily to take pictures. Well, 108 blogs later, I’ve finally decided to do a comprehensive breakdown of how I pack my carry-on bag. I start with the attitude that if the airline loses my check-in bag, I could still continue on with my trip without much inconvenience. As such, I only pack in my check-in bag extra clothing, toiletries, and medication that I can live without should the airline lose them. In fact, I’ve traveled to Africa on a few occasions without actually checking a bag. Traveling light is the key, because the more you have to carry, the more difficulty you will have getting around, and the more you will miss. I travel with a minimal amount of clothing, but mostly stick with synthetic materials and bring a small bottle of detergent so that I can wash clothing by hand every two or three days. Synthetics also dry much faster. The following image shows the contents of my photo backpack laid out. The bag is a Clik Elite. I’ve used other bags in the past and found that for the hard use I give them, they tended to break down to the point that my heavy lenses were all sitting in the bottom of the bag after a long day of walking. (I am not endorsed by Clik Elite.) The Clik Elite bag gets dirty, but it holds up to a beating.

The contents of my photo bag when traveling to Ethiopia.
The contents of my photo bag when traveling to Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents:

1. Canon 5D Mk2 SLR camera. 21 megapixels which is plenty should I need to crop the picture later. It’s been beaten up, gotten wet, been in the dust, and still takes great pictures.

2. 4 lenses. My two primary lenses are a Canon 135 mm f2 for taking tight portraits, and a Sigma 35 mm f 1.4 for taking wider portraits and landscapes. These are my go-to lenses for taking those winning shots. The shallow depth of field I get and the low light capabilities make carrying these totally worth the extra weight of redundant focal length lenses.  My two other lenses for more general use are a Canon 24-70 f2.8 and a Canon 70-200 f4 image stabilized lens.

3. Canon G1X Point and shoot camera. It’s small and discreet for when I have to be less conspicuous, but has an APS-C sized sensor inside for much better quality pictures than a typical point and shoot camera. It also shoots 1080p video. The camera does have its limitations though, just due to what it is.

4. Extra batteries for both cameras, as well as chargers.

5. 300 gigabytes of memory cards. At least some need to be fast enough to shoot video.

6. Oben carbon fiber tripod with ball head. This is a must if you’re going to shoot video or time exposures.

7. Camelbak All Clear bottle. This has an ultra-violet lamp built in so I can purify water should I need to. It purifies unsafe water in one minute. I drank water out of the Nile for five days without getting sick using this. I also stuff the bottle with an extra pair of clean socks and undies for traveling. (Use your space to the fullest).

8. Extra pair of pants and a fleece shirt. (It can be quite cold in the parts of Ethiopia I go to.) I also pack extra clothing into any empty spaces in the bag.

9. Ipad 64 gig (not shown). This has reading material, allows my to load pictures and write my blog while away, and has VOIP software for making phone calls when I have wi-fi overseas.

10. Adapters for linking my camera to the iPad.

11. Unlocked GSM world phone. This is a multi-band phone that I can buy a sim-card for when I get to Africa so I can make local calls. I can also call home with it when there’s no internet available but cell phone service is.

12. Passport and yellow fever card. Many countries in Africa require proof you’ve had your yellow fever immunization.

13. Power converter and adapters. Lets you plug in your US based electronics into foreign outlets.

14. Case of photo filters with polarizing filters and Neutral Density filters.

15. Disposable eyeglass wipes for cleaning lenses. Travel is too dirty to reuse a normal lens cleaning cloth.

16. Hand sanitizer.

17. Wet wipes for cleanup when there is no water available or for on the plane. (These are your best friend in Africa.)

18. Remote trigger for camera. Needed for taking long time-exposures or for discreetly triggering your camera.

19. Pain reliever. (I have plantar fasciitis which can hurt after standing all day.)

20. Bug spray. This is a necessity if you are going to areas where malaria is common.

21. Head lamp. Africa is frequently very dark.

22. Cash and credit cards. (Not shown)

What I didn’t bring but could have

1. Anti-malarial drugs. You have to weigh your risks. I’ll only be in an area with malaria for a couple days, so is it worth being on drugs with potential side effects for two days of protection? I decided not to. That’s why I have bug spray. Also, use the mosquito nets at night if you’re in an area with malaria and don’t be outside in the evening.

2. A flash. I’ve brought a flash before, but found that for my style of shooting, out of a couple thousand pictures taken, I used the flash for about 10.

So you might have a hard time believing that all that goes into the bag. I can assure you that it does. It does fit under a the seat in front of you even on a small plane, though I usually have to take the tripod off and place it beside. Weight is almost certainly over the limit, but fortunately most airlines don’t weight your carry-on bag. So here is the bag as it’s packed and ready to go. As a side note, my check-in bag is also a backpack, so that if I have to travel over distances cross country I can put one over each shoulder. Total weight for both bags is somewhere between 50 and 60 pounds.

My packed carry-on bag for traveling to Ethiopia.
My packed carry-on bag for traveling to Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To The Uttermost Parts Of The Earth.

“But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you. And you will be my witnesses, telling people about me everywhere–in Jerusalem, throughout Judea, in Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.” These words of Jesus were the last he spoke before he was taken up to Heaven. I am blessed to have been able to go many times now to the uttermost parts of the earth. Tomorrow I will buy airline tickets, and soon I will go to even more uttermost parts than last time. I won’t be specific as to where yet, but I will be in  Ethiopia again.

Some people say they don’t hear God’s voice. I have to say that I do. Sometimes it’s in the form of thoughts that I know in my knower are the truth. Other times it’s in the voice of someone else, or in dreams, or in things that I read. There are many ways God can speak if you’re listening. But you do have to put away all the busyness of the world around, let the distractions go, and listen for that voice that comes when you’re paying attention.  I spoke with God recently, and my first question was, “Lord, am I supposed to go back to Ethiopia?” As soon I asked the question I felt a bit foolish, not because I asked it, but because I asked a question that, had I been thinking about it, I would have already known the answer. The answer I got was, “I have given you many opportunities now; I’ve given you a passion for this, and a passion for people and the gospel. Most of your funds are raised even before you started trying to raise them. I’ve cleared your schedule at the specific time you would need to go. I’ve given you a wife who is supportive of you in all these things. Do you really need to keep asking if you’re supposed to go? I’ll tell you when you’re NOT supposed to go.

I’m excited for this trip. Frankly I’ve been excited about all of them except for one, but that’s another story. We’ll be covering some new territory, but also some familiar, and building on the relationships we’ve already established. All the while I will be documenting again, so there will be plenty of pictures. I won’t be specific on places and times until I’m already there, but I will be putting my thoughts down all the while, even if I don’t publish them until later. I learn more about myself than I do about Africa every time I go. I expect this time to be no different, and look forward to sharing what I’ve learned.

The sun rising over the crosses of an Orthodox Church in Addis Ababa.
The sun rising over the crosses of an Orthodox Church in Addis Ababa.

The Great Summary In Pictures

This is my 100th blog post on South Sudan Traveler, and what better way to celebrate it than with some of my favorite pictures of all time. Some you’ve seen in previous blog posts, but many others are brand new (at least to you). I think back to my first time going to South Sudan back in 2010, before it was its own country. I think back to how green I was, but fully aware that I am simply a different shade of green now. My perspectives have changed since that time, but thankfully I have the pictures to document how those perspectives changed. So please enjoy Africa as I’ve seen it over the last five years, from South Sudan to Kenya to Ethiopia. Soon I will have even more. All pictures can be clicked on for a bit larger view. Also, I am beginning to work on a book that will feature the unexpurgated version of Africa you don’t see in the brochure. More on that later.

The watchman in Ethiopia
The watchman in Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A boy looks in the window of a polling place shortly before independence in South Sudan.
A boy looks in the window of a polling place shortly before independence in South Sudan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making a mask out of bottle tops and an engine fan in South Sudan
Making a mask out of bottle tops and an engine fan in South Sudan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The cattle drive.
The cattle drive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sudan-2637
The look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A South Sudanese pastor weeps in prayer as he prays that God would make him in private the man he claims to be in public.
A South Sudanese pastor weeps in prayer as he prays that God would make him in private the man he claims to be in public.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The girls at the reform school in Kenya
The girls at the reform school in Kenya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linus, our sponsor child's grandfather, gives his respect as we leave.
Linus, our sponsor child’s grandfather, gives his respect as we leave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The moon setting as dawn approaches in Ethiopia.
The moon setting as dawn approaches in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

praying for a sick child.
praying for a sick child.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visiting an Ethiopian widow in her home.
Visiting an Ethiopian widow in her home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A little girl carries her sister in South Sudan
A little girl carries her sister in South Sudan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A woman in Ethiopia
A woman in Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baskets of fresh tea, Kimunye, Kenya
Baskets of fresh tea, Kimunye, Kenya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women carrying thatch for a new roof in Torit, South Sudan.
Women carrying thatch for a new roof in Torit, South Sudan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An old woman in Liliir, South Sudan
An old woman in Liliir, South Sudan
Life in Gojo, Ethiopia
Life in Gojo, Ethiopia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The beautiful village of Panwel, South Sudan
The beautiful village of Panwel, South Sudan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The beautiful Tabitha, who was tragically killed last year in South Sudan. We miss her.
The beautiful Tabitha, who was tragically killed last year in South Sudan. We miss her.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful smile in Ethiopia.
Beautiful smile in Ethiopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Ethiopian widow with her new calf.
The Ethiopian widow with her new calf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two Maasai women near Bisil, Kenya.
Two Maasai women near Bisil, Kenya.